Author Archives: Andy "SuperFly" Rundquist

About Andy "SuperFly" Rundquist

Associate professor of physics at Hamline.

Assessment Fridays

Long-time readers of my blog know that August and January often feature posts with crazy syllabus brainstorms. This is one of those. I’m teaching calc-based General Physics 2 this fall (yes, gen phys 2 in the fall, deal with it) … Continue reading

Posted in sbar, sbg, syllabus creation, teaching | 3 Comments

1 standard per day

I’m often involved in conversations with people about Standards-Based Grading where we focus on how many standards we should have. I’ve settled recently on a “1 standard per day” approach that works for me and I wanted to get my … Continue reading

Posted in sbar, sbg, syllabus creation, teaching | 7 Comments

doodle notes

A while ago I saw a news report about these guys. They specialize on providing note takers for big events (usually speakers). The note takers try to produce an extended doodle that captures the essence of what’s spoken. I thought … Continue reading

Posted in teaching, technology | 10 Comments

Breadth vs depth

This tweet really got me thinking recently: @rjallain @orzelc Sorry if you have already discussed this, but I'm interested in a discussion on what college profs want from HS physics. — Casey Rutherford (@rutherfordcasey) May 15, 2014 In the Global … Continue reading

Posted in glodal physics department, teaching, twitter | 14 Comments

Flipped flip debrief

This semester I taught our optics elective using a similar approach that I used in our non-science-majors physics of sound and music last semester. Here’s a couple of posts about this class. The main approach consisted of: Students are not … Continue reading

Posted in sbar, sbg, screencasting, syllabus creation, teaching | 5 Comments

Finding normal modes

Normal mode analysis is a typical topic in junior/senior mechanics courses. Ours suffers from a lack of linear algebra as a prerequisite so I’ve worked to find ways to engage students with this material without that background. My typical approach … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica, physics, teaching | 8 Comments

Maxwell to Snell

Today was a really interesting day in my optics class. We’re doing chapter 9 in our text and I wanted to make sure that I motivated the material well. What’s weird about this text is that it waits until chapter … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 2 Comments