Category Archives: mathematica

Optimal race path

I ride my bike to work so I’m often thinking about the best path to take around corners. I know bike racers and car racers (and bob sledders) are often told to head into a corner wide, then cut the … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica, physics, Uncategorized | 4 Comments

Can a pendulum save you?

I’m so thankful to my friend Chija for pointing out this video for me: Here’s her tweet https://t.co/dE3xMo3lRc can't wait to analyze this video in class! #ilovephysics #soexcited — Chija Bauer (@bauerphysics) January 25, 2016 When I saw it I … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica, physics, twitter, Uncategorized | 2 Comments

Unstable rotation (spinning handle in space)

First, watch this: Cool, huh? My students found this last year when we were studying rigid body rotation. One of the things we did a lot was try to spin a tennis racquet about an axis in the plane of … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica, physics, Uncategorized | 4 Comments

Best bingo board

My son is in the third grade and his math homework is to play games. The other night we played one that really got me thinking. Each player makes a 4×4 board and puts in any even number between 8 … Continue reading

Posted in fun, math, mathematica, parenting, Uncategorized | 9 Comments

Finite Elements Methods in Mathematica

In Mathematica 10 there’s now the ability to solve differential equations using finite element methods (FEM). I’ve spent some time this summer playing around with the tools and I thought I’d write this to help me remember some stuff. The … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica | 2 Comments

Rugby ball bouncing

A friend of mine was telling me that when you play rugby, you can count on the ball bouncing up nice and high for you every third bounce. He showed me in the gym how that’s basically true and I’ve … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica, physics | 1 Comment

How to drill a well

In one of my courses this semester students were learning about the coriolis and centrifugal forces that things seem to experience on the earth. There’s a problem at the back of the chapter that asks when a dropped rock would … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica, physics, teaching | 7 Comments