Category Archives: mathematica

Double pendulum roller coaster

I’ve been doing a lot of modeling of beads on wires lately, but today I discovered something that really surprised me. The surprise came when I found a bead/wire system that seemed to violate conservation of energy. Now, it turns … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica, physics | 2 Comments

Lagrange multipliers revisited

I spent the last few days trying to decide whether to teach Lagrange multipliers in my Theoretical Mechanics course. Ultimately I decided to go ahead and do it and I wanted to get down my thoughts on why and what … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica, physics, syllabus creation, teaching | Leave a comment

What does the conducting paper lab teach?

At my school we have a lab for electric fields/potentials where they measure potentials at different locations on a piece of conducting paper that has been attached to a power supply (the + lead and – lead of the power … Continue reading

Posted in fun, mathematica, physics | 5 Comments

Evolution of the traveling salesperson

The traveling salesperson problem is a relatively famous math/geometry/computer science problem. The version I’ll be talking about in this post is where the salesperson has to visit several points on a map, minimizing the travel distance. Repeating a point on … Continue reading

Posted in fun, math, mathematica | 11 Comments

String resonance

My friend Will posted a cool animation today: GIF of the forced fixed string envelope showing nodes/antinodes for different k values. Driver on left. http://t.co/nCZh93arYa — Will Slaton (@wslaton) October 4, 2014 It got me thinking about the lab we … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica, physics, twitter | 6 Comments

Finding normal modes

Normal mode analysis is a typical topic in junior/senior mechanics courses. Ours suffers from a lack of linear algebra as a prerequisite so I’ve worked to find ways to engage students with this material without that background. My typical approach … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica, physics, teaching | 8 Comments

Finding grains

My colleague asked me to help him out with this image: He needs to know the grain size distribution, and they’ve been having trouble automating this. He knew I’d been doing some work with Mathematica’s image analysis capabilities so he … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica, physics | 5 Comments