Author Archives: Andy "SuperFly" Rundquist

About Andy "SuperFly" Rundquist

Professor of physics at Hamline University in St. Paul, MN

How to drill a well

Posted in mathematica, physics, teaching | 7 Comments

In class versus screencast

Something happened in class on Friday that I wanted to get down before I forgot about it. It’s a good follow up to my last post about the value of class time. On Fridays we do a review of the … Continue reading

Posted in syllabus creation, teaching | 1 Comment

Back flip doesn’t help students who miss class

In my Theoretical Mechanics course the other day we were talking about noninertial forces (like centrifugal and coriolis forces) on the surface of the earth. We did all kinds of examples related to weather, cannons, and cars driving. However, we … Continue reading

Posted in sbar, sbg, syllabus creation | 8 Comments

Genetic algorithm for randomizing oral exams

I’ve written before about using genetic algorithms to solve problems, but I wanted to show how flexible they can be by writing here about how they helped me this week. My problem was that I wanted to assign standards to … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica, syllabus creation | 8 Comments

Stepper motor with Arduino motor shield

We have a bunch of Ardunio-brand motor shields and I wanted to jot down what it took to drive a stepper motor with them. The documentation really only tells you how to hook up DC motors, though it does say … Continue reading

Posted in arduino | 1 Comment

Keep from just plowing through

I spent a good portion of the day trying to figure out what I wanted to do in my Theoretical Mechanics class tomorrow. We’ve recently begun the chapter on central potentials and I wasn’t sure how far to try to … Continue reading

Posted in sbar, sbg, syllabus creation | 2 Comments

Double pendulum roller coaster FIXED

My last post was wrong. I’m to blame. But in thinking about it and talking about it with with lots of helpful friends I ended up learning a ton. Here’s the upshot: There were kinks in the roller coaster loop … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica, physics | 7 Comments