Author Archives: Andy "SuperFly" Rundquist

About Andy "SuperFly" Rundquist

Professor of physics at Hamline University in St. Paul, MN

Critical Disagreement

I’m just wrapping up my time spent at a really great conference that’s all about the First-Year Experience for students in college. I’ve got lots of thoughts running through my head, including lots of cool ideas for a large part … Continue reading

Posted in dean, physics, teaching | 2 Comments

No connections

Driving home today I heard a great story on NPR. I liked it so much that I thought I’d put it here to remind myself about it. I might have forgotten some of the details, but I think I still … Continue reading

Posted in fun, teaching, technology | 1 Comment

Mass changing orbits

A few weeks ago my good friend John Burk posted some intriguing questions about what happens to planetary orbits as the sun loses mass (all that heat has to come from somewhere!). I’ve been thinking about it ever since and … Continue reading

Posted in general physics, mathematica, physics | 2 Comments

What are integers

This morning over the breakfast table my family had a great conversation about integers It started when my youngest, L (5th grade), talked about his math test tomorrow. He said the whole chapter was easy and that he wasn’t worried … Continue reading

Posted in math, parenting | 4 Comments

Snow wave

Earlier today I posted this pic and asked a question about it on twitter: What determines the wavelength of the snow pattern? pic.twitter.com/KqPKla2IIJ — Andy Rundquist (@arundquist) December 10, 2017 If you click through you’ll see lots of great ideas. … Continue reading

Posted in physics, teaching, Uncategorized | 7 Comments

Crowd-prioritized questions for speakers

This past week I tried an experiment during a major speaking engagement on my campus. This was our annual “Commitment to Community” address by the fabulous Kemba Smith. We had her on campus for a day and she interacted with … Continue reading

Posted in community, teaching | Leave a comment

Harmonic drums neural network

I’ve written before about my research group’s efforts at trying to find harmonic drums. One of those students wants to continue that work as a independent study so I’ve been putting some more thought into it. This post is about … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica, programming, research | 2 Comments