Author Archives: Andy "SuperFly" Rundquist

About Andy "SuperFly" Rundquist

Professor of physics at Hamline University in St. Paul, MN

Physics majors practice presentations

For years we’ve been working to give our physics majors opportunities to improve their presentation skills. We do a lot of oral exams but we also want our students to do well in more formal settings. We have a junior/senior seminar … Continue reading

Posted in syllabus creation, teaching | 3 Comments

Wasted 10 minute quiz

These days I do a daily quiz for my students. It’s a problem randomly selected from the three problems assigned last time (unless it’s a review day, then it’s randomly selected from the previous 2 days). These are typically deep, … Continue reading

Posted in syllabus creation, teaching, Uncategorized | 8 Comments

Interactive arduino internet-of-things

I’ve written before about my Math and Computational Methods for Physicist course and how we’re doing a cool Arduino-based Internet of Things project. I’ve been brainstorming some new things we might do with that project and I wanted to see … Continue reading

Posted in arduino, HUWebApps | 4 Comments

Web apps workgroup

We’ve been thinking a lot lately about finding new ways to give our students more computer programming skills. We don’t have a computer science major but are willing to do certificate/minor-type things that will help students succeed in their chosen … Continue reading

Posted in technology | 3 Comments

Arduino internet of things

This summer several colleagues and I had some seed money to brainstorm ways to put more sustainability ideas into our curriculum (physics, chemistry, and math was represented). One of the projects we decided to flesh out is having students develop … Continue reading

Posted in arduino, community, lab, technology | 5 Comments

Teaching driving is depressing

My son is learning to drive. I’m past the “oh crap” stage and the “but just . . .!” stage and squarely into the “it’s going . . . ok” stage. He takes his test next month and I’m pretty … Continue reading

Posted in teaching, Uncategorized | 5 Comments

Help us crowd-source our drums!

My students have been working hard this summer on a project I’ve talked about before. Here’s the gist: Normal drums aren’t melodic. They have resonant frequencies but they aren’t in a pattern that we think sounds good. That’s why they’re … Continue reading

Posted in mathematica, physics, research, Uncategorized | Leave a comment