Author Archives: Andy Rundquist

About Andy Rundquist

Professor of physics at Hamline University in St. Paul, MN

Learning outcomes for research skills

tl:dr: I’d love some feedback on the SEEC approach with students: S: Students should see that all ideas are embedded in a complex web of ideas E: Students should explore that web when dealing with an idea E: Students should … Continue reading

Posted in dean, teaching | 4 Comments

Stable, asymmetric dice

A while ago I set about trying to find asymmetric dice that might be fair. I’ve put a lot more work into it, but mostly because there’s been a lot of frustrating interesting tangents. Here’s the main thrust of the … Continue reading

Posted in fun, mathematica, physics | 3 Comments

See the process

A few weeks ago I gave a presentation at the American Association of Physics Teachers summer conference in a session about accessible technology. I talked about how I make use of student assessment videos, but I tried something new in … Continue reading

Posted in screencasting, teaching | 1 Comment

Research introduction for students

This summer I’m developing a fully-online course for transfer students to help them hit the ground running in our program (this is part of an entirely online program currently for psychology and business majors). The learning outcomes for the course … Continue reading

Posted in dean, research, teaching | 2 Comments

Helicopter vs snowplow

Working in the dean’s office has given me all sorts of new respect for the Dean of Students office. Specifically, I’ve been very impressed at how they leverage students’ parents when helping the students get through tough times. My experience … Continue reading

Posted in dean, research, teaching | 4 Comments

Form workflow using Google Apps Script

Now that I’m in the dean’s office (Associate Dean for undergraduates in the College of Liberal Arts if you must know) I serve on a lot of committees. Several of them accept submissions from faculty, staff, or students and have … Continue reading

Posted in dean, programming, technology | Leave a comment

Fair Asymmetric Dice, getting there

Ever since my son and I worked on whether different types of 20-sided dice were fair I’ve been thinking about whether there might be some oddly shaped dice that could still be fair.  I’ve watched these three numberphile videos and I’ve looked … Continue reading

Posted in fun, mathematica, physics | 6 Comments